Why Digital Transformation is One of the Hottest Business Trends today

Digital Transformation is one of the hottest trends in the private sector today. In fact, it will spell the difference between the winners and the losers. Companies that get it right are seeing their market caps soar; those that get it wrong are growing slowly or – even worse – falling by the wayside.

In the next few pages we will track the winners and losers in terms your chief financial officer can relate to. Then we will discuss the technologies and business initiatives that are driving business as well as the related organizational and leadership challenges. We will wrap up by summarizing the threats companies will face even if they are successful in adopting the digital transformation.

What is Digital Transformation, anyway?

When we talk about the Digital Transformation, we are talking about leveraging the Information Technology developments that are not only new, but have demonstrated (or hold the promise of demonstrating) significant business value. These are technologies that are coming of age in 2016 and 2017. In many cases, we have isolated success stories to inspire us but probably not a critical mass of implementations to ensure that there is a body of “best practices” to guide us. In other words, we are working at the frontier. Nevertheless, the directions are very, very clear.

When we talk about the Digital Transformation, we are talking about adopting the following types of technologies to drive significant business advantage.

Internet of Things Machine Learning Big Data
Collaboration Tools Digital Embedded Products 3D Printing
Digital Marketing Mobile eCommerce Predictive Demand
Predictive Maintenance Robotic Process Automation Customer Journey Analytics
“As A Service” Remote Worker Enablement Digital Marketing
Digital Service Management Smart Devices

In every case, adopting these technologies is easy. The difficult part is integrating the technologies into the fabric of the company and leveraging them to advantage. This requires companies to manage difficult organizational development processes which include shifts in organizational structures, shifts in compensation and recognition, hiring or training staff with new skills and ensuring that they have a “home” in the organization. While doing all this, management needs to learn how to provide the leadership that will be required and protect embryonic programs from cost justification models that are no longer relevant.

Success in Digital Transformation is a Prerequisite for Financial Success

One study[1] looked at the relationship between the financial success of companies included in Standard & Poor’s 500 Index together with the 20 largest companies on the Toronto Stock Exchange and the number of references to terms that characterize the digital transformation used in the chairmen’s annual letters. Due to selection criteria, the study dealt with only 449 companies. The results could not have been clearer. In every single industry (with two exceptions) interest in implementing digital transformation initiatives was highly correlated with the growth in those companies’ market caps.

The industries included in the study were:

Banking Biotech & Pharma Broadcasting and Communications
Consumer Discretionary Consumer Packaged Goods Diversified Financial Services
Health care Equipment & Distribution Health Care Providers Industrials
Information Technology Insurance Internet Commerce and Services
Materials Oil & Gas Real Estate and REITS
Retail Utilities

The study team studied the chairmen’s letters in their annual reports to look for the frequency of 10 keywords. Those keywords were:

Analytics App Big Data
Cloud Digital Internet of Things
Mobile Robotics, Robots Sensor
Social Media

Interestingly, in total, there has been a steady, year-over-year increase over a five-year period in the number of times these keywords appeared in the chairmen’s letters. That suggests that digital transformation issues are becoming increasingly important to senior management and the boards of directors. The strongest growth was in the use of the terms big data, cloud, and analytics.

The study team did not focus on the size of the companies or the counts of the 10 keywords, but rather the year-over-year increases in the uses of these keywords and their year-over-year improvement in financial performance.

They found that there were strong positive correlations with the increase in the use of these keywords and three financial metrics:

  • Market cap growth
  • Net income market growth
  • EBITDA margin growth

The correlations were less pronounced for two other financial metrics:

  • Revenue growth
  • Return of assets growth

Market capitalization is the most important of all these financial metrics. The 50% of these companies that used these keywords the most reported an average 18% average annual increase in market caps while the 50% that used these keywords the least reported an average annual increase in market caps of 12%. Let’s look at this a different way. The first group of companies grew their market caps about $4.25 billion a year while the second group grew about $3 billion a year. That’s a $1 billion a year difference! Big money in my book.

It would be foolhardy to claim that correlations like these dictate causality, but you have to admit that something interesting is going on here.

By the way, the two industries that do NOT follow this general correlation are banking and Biotech and Pharma. Market cap growth for banking did not keep up in proportion to its increases in the use of the keywords. Biotech and Pharma companies, on the other hand, increased their market caps far more than their use of the keywords would suggest. We won’t speculate about why this is the case.

Technology Trends

Mobile Apps – Companies are developing apps that run on mobile devices or tablets. These are special purpose apps that can be designed to handle corporate-only needs, customer-only needs, or a blend of the two. The use of desktop and laptop computers is declining in relative terms.

Big Data – Companies are processing huge masses of unstructured data that comes from internal data bases and external sources. In fact, those external sources make up the bulk of the data processed. Companies use Big Data to identify new trends or insights that had not been considered before. This is quite different from traditional study approaches that started with an hypothesis that needed to be proven or disproven. Big Data provides insights that improve machine operations, minimize downtime, and improve profitability among other things.

Machine Learning — Like Big Data, Machine Learning uses content-specific algorithms to process huge quantities of unstructured data. But, unlike Big Data, Machine Learning develops “skills” that outstrip the corresponding skills of human professionals. These “skills” include preparing recommendations on issuing lines of credit, diagnosing cancers, and assessing applications for prison parole.

Cloud Computing – This refers to putting some IT functions on remote computers that are readily available over the Internet. These functions may include remote data storage, remote processing, or remote access to specialized software. We call it “cloud computing” because the users (companies or individuals) do not need to understand where the service is provided or the mechanisms of providing it. It is simply a utility that users can tap into on an “as needed” basis.

Internet of Things (IoT) — This refers to putting sensors in a wide range of devices, setting up communication links between those sensors and a computer (or network of computers), using the knowledge to diagnose problems, track progress, or initiate corrective action. IoT provides the greatest value when it networks huge numbers of sensors and is coupled with algorithms that provide a significant “value-add.”

Mobile Computing – Consumers are switching away from desktop and laptop computers to their mobile devices instead: smart phones and tablets. This has huge implications for everything from website design to eCommerce to marketing.

Robots – For many years, robots were limited to factory floors carrying out routine tasks under tight controls. Robots today are capable of far more sophisticated tasks because they can “see,” “hear,” “feel,” and “taste.” They are often equipped with sensors that are required for their jobs and beyond the capabilities of people. For example, they can accurately measure temperature, barometric pressure, pressure, acceleration, location, time, and shock. Robots have become sophisticated enough that Spread, a Japanese agricultural company, uses robots to pick 30,000 heads of lettuce a day.

Social Media – This technology originally appealed to high school and university students who just wanted to keep their friends up to date about their day-to-day activities. Today, companies are using social media to test the sentiment of their user and customer communities. They are also using it as an increasingly influential marketing channel.

Natural Language Processing (NLP) – NLP is a branch of Artificial Intelligence that accepts human language in “raw” form, processes it, and assigns some “meaning” to the material it reads. In other words, NLP is a facility for computers to understand either written or spoken language. This is becoming increasingly important because only 20% of a company’s records are in structured formats. The rest is in emails, documents, videos, etc. NLP can process this unstructured material.

Computer Vision — Computer Vision simulates human vision. It is the ability to understand images and videos. This enables robots to operate in messy environments and search for particular products or components.

This list is not exhaustive. In fact, new technologies are being introduced at such a rapid rate, that any list would be obsolete within a few months.

Industry Trends

“As a Service” – In the past, companies and consumers needed to buy or lease the computer hardware and software they needed. Now they can access only what they need when they need it over the net. Software as a Service (SaaS) allows users to access software applications that run in the cloud. Salesforce.com and many of the Google apps run on a Software as a Service basis. Platform as a Service (Paas) provides users a software development environment as well as on-going operational support in the cloud. Users develop their own applications rather than using pre-packaged apps as they do with SaaS. Infrastructure as a Service (Iaas) is more basic. Iaas simply provides hardware, storage, and networks. IaaS users supply their own operating systems and load their own applications. This service allows users to scale up or scale down their use of raw computing power as their demands fluctuate.

Profits are in the Digital Transformation Products – One article[2] reported that 86% of new products were introduced into existing markets while only 14% were into new markets. However, 61% of the profits came from the products in the new markets.

Digitizing the Supply Chain – McKinsey projected improvements potential in this area: 30+% reduction in machine downtime, 20+% decrease in inventory holding costs, 20+% time to market reduction, and 10+% maintenance costs reduction.

Digitization in Human Resources –– Nearly all positions today require some expertise in IT. Staff expect to find at least the same quality IT experience at work that they enjoy with their consumer products. IT systems are the primary recruiting and screening tools for employees aged 18 to 34.

Online Research First, Sales People Later – In the past, sales people made initial contact with prospects, provided the background material they needed to understand the issues involved in their customers’ buying decisions, and submitted proposals. Today, both corporate and consumer buyers do their own research online. They read white papers from thought leaders, review the “consumer reports” for their industry, and check out the social media comments about the companies they are considering doing business with. They call on salespeople only after they have thoroughly familiarized themselves with the issues and have a very good idea what they are looking for. Corporate success in the market, then, increasingly depends on companies’ abilities to present themselves to advantage in the online world: websites, SEO, social media, etc.

Customer Intimacy – Companies that provide IoT products and services often know their customers’ operations more intimately than the customers themselves. This positions those manufacturers to make and justify recommendations to their customers that would be impossible otherwise.

Product Recalls – Companies that need to issue product recalls and can fix the problems with software updates that can be delivered over the net can handle their recalls with very modest costs. All others pay huge sums. For example, in 2014 GM paid $4.1 billion for product recalls. This wiped out GM’s profits in an otherwise banner year.

Application Trends

Rent, Don’t Buy – Corporations and consumers will gravitate toward paying for services they need when they need them rather than buying products. For example, Daimler offers a service it calls Car2Go. Rather than buying a car, subscribers can pick up a car at a nearby location, drive it to their destination, and drop it off. They are charged for the use of the car only when they actually use it. Drivers manage the transaction through a mobile app.

Robots Will Replace People – Robots mix drinks for passengers on Royal Caribbean’s Anthem of the Seas. Robots scurry around warehouses to retrieve goods on demand. They can assemble electronic components, sew garments, and make coffee.

Artificial Intelligence Apps Outperform the Best Humans – AI apps offer cancer patients personalized information and advice. They speed up DNA analysis. They provide tailored health and fitness recommendations as well as provide financial advice to investors. They provide legal advice. They help KPMG staff improve their financial audits by blending financial data with free-form narrative.

Blurred Boundaries Between Physical and Digital Products – Before the current wave of technologies, the boundaries between physical products and their digital add-ons were clear. Today companies sell products that can only work in a world that has made the digital transformation. The Apple Watch is only one small but obvious example. More importantly, customers – both corporate and consumer – demand products that have digital value-add components designed in rather than bolted on.

Organizational Trends

Digital Transformation Vision Statements – In the past, companies incorporated new technologies on an ad hoc basis. Now senior management – and even the boards of directors – play active roles in defining their vision statements for digital transformation in their companies. Digital Transformation vision statements define what the companies plan to achieve in a few years.

Permanent Loss of Jobs — Until recently, the jobs lost through the introduction of Information Technology were offset by new jobs that required higher level skills such as programmers, database managers, project managers, and systems designers. Now, it is clear that the jobs that are lost during this wave of digital transformation are unlikely to ever be replaced. Studies at Oxford University and MIT suggest that 47% of all jobs are likely to be permanently lost.[3]

Contract or “Gig” Staff – There is a general move away from hiring permanent employees in favor of hiring staff on demand. Intuit projects that 40% of all work will be handled on contract by 2020.[4]

Finance Will Handle Higher Order Functions – Historically, Finance has been responsible for paying the bills and the employees and providing periodic reports. Now it is also responsible for providing analytical insights into their companies’ operations, managing business intelligence, and putting a dollar value on intangible assets.

Cyber Security Risks Will Soar – Earlier this year Equifax suffered a security breach that stole information about 140 million Americans and 15 million people in the UK.[5] This is a sign of more severe security risks in the future. Cyber-security risks apply not only to companies’ internal operations, but to the digital products and services they offer their customers. Companies now see cyber-security as a top priority. Many companies have created the position of Chief Information Security Officer (CISO). Banks use digital tools such as Machine Learning to track money laundering. Banks are automating compliance. Digital Transformation is vital to help banks manage the burden of growing legal requirements.

Government Will Play a Growing Role in the Digital Transformation – Governments define what is possible. It was government that enabled the digital transformation in the first place by releasing the internet to the general public. It also created and released the technologies for GPS, radar, and microchips.

Manage Relations with External Stakeholders – Companies must maintain a presence on social media. If not, bloggers and reporters will be the only source of online information about companies. Trans Canada Pipelines failed to understand this and found its application for a pipeline in the US turned down. The outcome could have been quite different with a more effective digital PR program.

Change Management – Changing the internal structure, staffing, information flows, procedures, and norms have been a constant in the corporate world. In the era of Digital Transformation, those changes are going to be far more rapid and more profound. Companies need to place far more emphasis on change management and organizational development. Senior corporate leadership must be evangelists for new technologies and visibly support the changes through speeches, recognition programs, promotions, training programs, and compensation metrics.

“Digital Centric” Advertising – One authoritative study[6] sponsored by Deloitte, the American Marketing Association, and Duke University reported that spending on traditional advertising has been dropping by 2.5% a year at the same time spending on digital advertising has been climbing 12+% a year. Internet oriented companies spend more on marketing: Companies that sell less than 10% on the internet spend less than 12% of their advertising budget online while those that sell more than 10% spend nearly 17% for online advertising.

Sales Process — The best sales teams use sales analytics 3.5x more than the worst. The percentage of companies using analytics will grow from 47% this year to 74% next year. The best sales teams are 4x more likely to use mobile sales apps.

Huge Shortage of Executive Digital Knowledge – SAP conducted a study of business executives regarding digital transformation skills. Only 27% of the respondents reported that their executives had the skills required to manage the digital transformation. Only 10% of the HR departments offered training (or access to training) to build the skills required for digital transformation.

Severe Shortage of Digital Transformation Talent – There is a large and growing unmet need for staff at all levels who can implement Big Data, IoT, Machine Learning, and other Digital Transformation systems. Companies are addressing this talent challenge four ways: upgrading staff already on board, attracting talent from outside, buying companies with the talent intact, and partnering with other companies that have this talent.

Corporate Valuations Are Shifting to Intangibles – In 1985, 32% of the value of a company was tied to intangibles. In 2015 that reversed: 84% of the value of companies was tied to intangibles.[7]

Centers of Excellence – Senior management recognizes that most of the digital transformation initiatives it needs to take will not pass muster using traditional financial assessment standards such as ROI. Rather than force-fitting these financial analyses, companies are setting up Centers of Excellence (previously called skunk works) that are funded directly at the senior management level and bypass traditional financial assessment processes. These centers are designed to foster expertise, develop prototype applications, run pilot projects, and develop staff who can migrate into the mainstream when their apps do.

End User Trends

Continual Upgrades Are the Norm – Users expect the products they buy to be obsolete within a year or less. Apple recognizes this and offers a program that allows their customers to pay a monthly fee and enjoy upgrades to new iPhones on an annual basis.

Flawless Operations Are the Norm – Users expect their equipment, software, networks, and data access to operate flawlessly. They no longer tolerate failures the way they did a decade ago.

Fast and Easy Access – Corporate customers and end users now expect to find it fast and easy to work with companies. They expect the same ease of operation that they now find on Amazon, Airbnb, Uber, and Agoda.

Mobile Is the Norm – Corporate users and consumers increasingly interact via mobile devices rather than laptops.

Consumers Shape Opinion via Social Media – Bloggers and end users report their opinions on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media channels. As a result, companies are focusing serious attention on their PR presence in social media.

Companies Now Spend Considerable Attention on “Mapping the Customer Journey” – This includes helping users assess their need (high-level messaging), conducting research (third party research reports), making decisions (product specific information), adopting products and services (self-service content), using the product/service (advanced educational materials), and making recommendations (build close customer relationships).

What’s the Message?

Rapid adoption of the appropriate Digital Transformation technologies will determine the difference between the winners and the losers. However, the emphasis needs to be placed on identifying the business applications that have the highest payoff. Selecting the right technologies follows easily from that point on.

 

[1] Doing Digital Right, Louis Lamoureux, 2017

[2] “Identify Blue Oceans by Mapping Your Product Portfolio,” Harvard Business Review, W. Chan Kim and Renee Mauborgne

[3] 47% of US jobs under threat from computerization according to Oxford study, https://newatlas.com/half-of-us-jobs-computerized/29142/

[4] Intuit: On-Demand Workers Will More Than Double By 2020, https://www.fiverr.com/news/on-demand-workers-double

[5] Giant Equifax data breach: 143 million people could be affected, http://money.cnn.com/2017/09/07/technology/business/equifax-data-breach/index.html

[6] CMO Survey Report: Highlights and Insights, Christine Mooman, August 21, 2016, https://cmosurvey.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/11/2016/02/The_CMO_Survey-Highlights_and_Insights-Feb-2016.pdf

[7] Annual Study of Intangible Asset Market Value, Ocean Tomo, N.p., March 5, 2015, http://www.oceantomo.com/2015/03/04/2015-intangible-asset-market-value-study/

The Top Six Big Data Challenges in Education

education challenges

Top Big Data Challenges

The path to the successful application of Big Data to educational institutions is going to face at least six major Big Data challenges or road blocks that will have to be addressed one at a time:

Integration across institutional boundaries – K-12 schools are generally organized around academic disciplines. Universities are organized as separate schools, faculties, and departments. Each of these units operates somewhat independently of the others and share real estate as a matter of convenience. Integrating data across these organizational boundaries is going to be a major challenge. No organizational unit is going to surrender any part of its power base easily. Data is power.

Self-service analytics and data visualization –– It is going to be a piece of cake to give planners and decision makers the technology based tools they need to do their own analytics and visualize the results of their studies graphically. It is going to be a genuine challenge to create a culture that requires them to do their own studies using those tools. An even greater challenge will be to create a climate that informs their decision making with the results of their own studies because they are so accustomed to making decisions intuitively.

Privacy – There is a great deal of concern – perhaps even excessive concern – about the privacy of the information collected about each student and her family. The concern is that this data could fall into the wrong hands or be abused by those who have been given responsibility for safeguarding the information. To some extent, this is a technological and management issue. However, the fundamental issue is fear that the technical and management safeguards either won’t work or will be abused. Lisa Shaw, a parent in the New York City public school system said, “It’s really invasive. There’s no amount of monetary funds that could replace personal information that could be used to hurt or harm our children in the future.”

Correlation vs cause and effect– Purists in rational argument want to see arguments that clearly spell out cause-and-effect relationships before blessing them as a basis for decision making. The fact that two factors may be highly correlated does not satisfy this demand for cause-and-effect. Nevertheless, real world experience in other areas of Big Data have shown that high correlations are sufficient by themselves to make decisions that are either lucrative or achieve the objectives the players in mind. This means they have been able to realize significant benefits based on correlation without being able to argue the underlying mechanics.

Money Nearly all educational institutions are strapped for money. When they make decisions to invest in the hardware, software, staff, and training to exploit Big Data, they are making decisions not to hire another professor, equip a student lab, or expand an existing building. That can be a tough call.

Numbers game Some argue – perhaps rightfully so – that Big Data reduces interactions with students to a numbers game. Recommendations and assessments are based entirely on analytics. This means that compassion, personal bonding, and an understanding of the unique circumstances of every student gets lost in the mix. Others argue that Big Data is an assist to the human process. In any event, this is unquestionably a stumbling block.

Privacy vs. Evidence Based Research

There is a great deal of concern about student privacy as we mentioned above, and it is one of the top Big Data challenges that must be resolved. One of the key reasons for this concern focuses on the process of growing up itself. It’s not unusual for students to participate in activist organizations in their youth that they reject later in life. Or they drank too much in university but sobered up once they had the responsibilities of jobs and families. Or a teacher may have given a student a negative evaluation that should not have survived his graduation or departure from the school. In the past, we simply forgot these things. Life moves on and we don’t give a great deal of attention to what happened 25 years ago. But permanent records that can be pulled up and viewed decades later may cast shadows on job candidates that are completely unwarranted at that time. In other words, we lose the ability to forget.

There is an even greater threat, though. Although there is general agreement about the value of predictive analytics, no one pretends that the predictions are inevitable. Nevertheless, a computer-generated prediction can take on the aura of truth. A prediction that a student is not suitable for a particular line of work may prevent hiring managers from hiring her for a position she is perfectly well suited to handle. These predictions can severely limit her opportunities in life forever.

One way of dealing with this is to pass legislation that limits access to student information, protects the identity of individuals, and yet still makes it available to those conducting legitimate educational research. Unfortunately, this ideal is better served in rhetoric than in reality.

Consider stripping student information of any identifying information and releasing it, along with records of other students in the same cohort, for general access for educational research. Yes, the school has taken all the required and appropriate steps to protect the students’ identity. But, no, it doesn’t work. That’s because Big Data practitioners generally access large data sets from a wide variety of sources. Some of those other sources (viz. Facebook) make no attempt to protect the individual’s identity. Those secondary sources have enough unique identifying characteristics that can be accurately correlated with the de-identified school records to re-identify those school records. The best laid plan of mice and men …………

There is no shortage of legislation in the US to protect student information. The most relevant legislation includes:

  • The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA). This act prohibits the unauthorised disclosure of educational records. FERPA applies to any school receiving federal funds and levies financial penalties for non-compliance.
  • The Protection of Pupil Rights Amendment (PPRA) of 1978. This act regulates the administration of surveys soliciting specific categories of information. It imposes certain requirements regarding the collection and use of student information for marketing purposes.
  • The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998 (COPPA). This act applies specifically to online service providers that have direct or actual knowledge of users under 13 and collect information online.

Unfortunately, this legislation is outdated and somewhat useless today. For example, it applies to schools but not to third party companies operating under contract to the schools. This legislation was enacted before the era of Big Data and doesn’t address the issues that this current technology raises. Further, the acts don’t include a “right of action.” This means there is no way to enforce the law.

In light of this, there are ongoing legislative attempts to deal with the need to protect the privacy of student information. Up until September 2015, 46 states introduced 162 laws dealing with student privacy; 28 of those pieces of legislation have been enacted in 15 states. There have been ongoing initiatives at the federal level as well. Relevant pieces of federal legislation that have been introduced include:

  • Student Digital Privacy and Parental Rights Act (SDPPRA)
  • Protecting Student Privacy Act (PSPA)
  • Student Privacy Protection Act (SPPA)

These acts are primarily concerned with protecting student data that schools pass along to third party, private sector companies for processing. In spite of the fact that these companies have generally built in their own data protection policies and procedures that already meet the requirements of this legislation, there is still considerable fear that the companies will use the data for nefarious purposes such as tailoring marketing messages to particular students – something that is clearly outside the scope of providing education or conducting educationally related research.

The US is not alone in its concern. The European Union has developed regulations that apply throughout the EU. This is in contrast to the fragmented American approach. To be fair to the Americans, however, the Constitution specifically provides that education is a state concern, not a federal one.

The EU 1995 Directive 95/46/EC is the most important EU legal instrument regarding personal data protection of individuals. Rather than discourage the use of third parties storing and processing student information, the EU prefers to regulate it. The EU recognizes that private sector companies provide a valuable service.

The Directive gives parents the option of opting out data sharing arrangements for their children. However, doing so would likely jeopardize the educational opportunities their children would enjoy otherwise. In other words, while parents have the right to opt out, it would be imprudent in practice to do so.

After considerable discussion and consultation, the EU Parliament approved the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR or Regulation). This Regulation is set to go into effect in May 2018.This Regulation pays particular attention to requiring schools to communicate “in a concise, transparent, intelligible and easily accessible form, using clear and plain language, in particular for any information addressed specifically to a child.”

Unfortunately, this is problematical. Big Data and Machine Learning develop algorithms that are quite opaque. Even the professionals who operate Big Data systems don’t know the inner workings of the algorithms their systems develop. Interestingly, they don’t even know which pieces of input are pivotal to the output and recommendations of those systems. In this context, it is reasonable that the general public sees EdTech companies as a threat to students’ autonomy, liberty, freedom of thought, equality and opportunity.

On the other hand, when you visit these EdTech websites, it certainly appears that they are driven by a sense of enlightenment. Their websites clearly suggest that they have the best interests of the students and their client schools in mind. Aside from the opaque nature of Big Data and Machine Learning algorithms, it is not clear – to this author at least – that EdTech companies deserve to be treated as skeptically as they are. It’s quite possible that the nub of the issue is not the stated objectives and current operations of these companies, but rather the uses that this data might be put to in the future and have not been foreseen today. In other words, the way the data might be used in the future is unpredictable. The unpredictable uses of the data could lead to unintended consequences.

In both Europe and the US, when we look at the furor about the importance of the privacy of student information, it often boils down to pedagogical issues.

Here is the nub of the conundrum in a nutshell. There is clearly a potential benefit of conducting educational research using student information. There is good reason to believe that tracking students over the course of their academic years – and perhaps even into their working careers – would allow scholars to identify early indicators of eventual success or failure. However, if scholars are prohibited from conducting that research by placing restrictions on student identification or restrictions on the length of time data can be stored, then that sort of research could not be conducted. This could conceivably lead to a loss of value to both individual students who could benefit from counseling informed by reliable research as well as to benefits to society at large.

How Is the Future of Big Data in Education Likely to Unfold?

Here are the trends to look for – in no particular order. These trends are instrumental in informing the schools’ policy development, strategic planning, tactical operations, and resource allocation, and overcoming the Big Data challenges in Education.

Focus student recruitment – Historically, colleges and universities have had student recruitment programs that were fairly broad in terms of geography and demographics. This led to a large number of student applications for admission. Unfortunately, many of the students the institutions accepted did not enrol in those schools. Colleges are now using Big Data to find those geographic areas and demographics where their promotional efforts not only generate large numbers of high caliber applicants, but also applicants who, if accepted into the college, will actually enrol.

Student retention and graduation Universities need to do more than attract high caliber students. They need to attract students who will stay in school and graduate. Big Data coupled with Machine Learning can help identify those students. In parallel with student recruitment, the schools will increasingly use Big Data to identify at risk students at the moment they show signs of falling behind. This will enable the schools to assist the students, help ensure their success, retain them in school, and increase the chances they will graduate.

Construction planning and facility upgrades Educational institutions at all levels have more demands to add or expand their buildings and upgrade their facilities than their budgets will permit. They need to establish priorities. Big Data will help planners sort through the data to identify those areas that are likely to be in highest demand and provide the greatest benefit to the students and the institutions.

Data centralization At the moment, nearly all data in educational institutions is held in organizational silos. That means that each department or organizational unit collects, stores, and manages the data it needs for its own purposes. That is a natural result of the need for each function to get its work done. However, it is counterproductive if we wish to apply Big Data. In the future, we can expect these siloed data stores to be integrated or linked virtually. Integration means that the data will be moved to a central repository and managed by a central function – like the IT department. Virtual integration means that the functional units will remain where they are at the moment but the IT department will have read access to each of these repositories. Quite likely, we will see both options in practice for the foreseeable future.

Data based decision making and planning Although Education has enjoyed the benefit of quantitative studies for centuries, the practice of education is generally driven by the philosophical views of educators more than data or evidence based studies. In fact, this approach has been enshrined in our commitment to academic freedom at the university level and has trickled down, to some extent, to public and private K-12 schools. Big Data will enable a data-rich culture that will inform policy development and operational planning to an extent we’ve never seen in the past.

Greater use of predictive analytics Machine Learning applied to Big Data will become increasingly successful at predicting students’ future success based on their past performance. Schools of all stripes will rely on these predictive analytics more and more in the future. This is likely to lead to two types of outcomes. On the one hand, schools will allocate more resources to those students most likely to succeed and, as a result, graduate more high-performing students who will deliver significant benefits to their communities and the world. On the other hand, predictive analytics will restrict the academic opportunities of failing students or those who show little promise – like Albert Einstein. Predictive analytics will also help institutions develop counter-intuitive insights that will challenge long cherished values and lead to better student and institutional results.

Local adoption of analytics tools Older readers will remember the days when word processing was handled by a pool of word processing typists. Over time, word processing migrated from the pool to executives’ assistants and, eventually, to the desks of the executives themselves. Once word processing reached the desks of the executives and other knowledge workers, word processing shifted from being a mechanical function to being a creative one. Knowledge workers crafted their messages as they took form on their screens. The same will be true of predictive analytics. We are going to see the hands-on management of predictive analytics studies migrate from Big Data specialists to the desktops (and laptops) of executives who need to think through, propose, and defend policy statements, strategic plans, and operational or tactical initiatives.

User experience – Educators often don’t know a student is having a problem until they see the student failing (or just barely passing) quizzes and tests. But, even when they recognize the problem, they don’t know the reasons any given student is falling behind. Big Data will help students by recognizing the problems they have as those problems occur. Then it can offer tutorials that address those problems as they occur – not days or weeks later when it may be too late to affect the students’ learning trajectories.

Real time quiz evaluations and corrective action. — As computers and tablets become ever more pervasive in classrooms, schools at all levels will be better able to collect digital breadcrumbs about how students perform on quizzes and determine what corrective action is required. This is going to eventually become the norm. Seven Ross, a professor at the Center for Research and Reform in Education at Johns Hopkins University agrees. He said, “Most of us in research and education policy think that for today’s and tomorrow’s generation of kids, it’s probably the only way.”

Privacy, privacy, privacy The privacy of student and family data will continue to be a hot issue. Over time, however, the benefits of sharing data with student identification data will outweigh the concerns of the general public. Sharing this data among qualified research professionals will become more socially acceptable not only as technological safeguards are put into place, but as they are accepted as being appropriate. In practice, society will discover that the student data they thought was secure, is not. Witness the data breach at Equifax that spilled confidential data about 143 million people. Do you remember the data breaches at Target and Home Depot? Again, tens of millions of people who trusted these companies with their credit card information were affected.

Learning Analytics and Educational Data Mining – We are seeing a new professional discipline emerge. The professionals in this field will have both the professional and technical skills to sort through the masses of unstructured educational data being collected on a wholesale basis, know what questions to ask, and then drill through the data to find useful, defensible insights that make a genuine difference in the field of Education. The demand for these specialists is likely to outstrip the supply for many years to come.

Games We are likely to see far more games introduced into the educational curriculum than we’ve ever seen before. Games are not only proven to be instrumental in the learning process, they also lend themselves to data acquisition for immediate or later analyses.

Flipped classrooms The Kahn Academy has reversed the historical process of delivering course material during class time and assigning homework to be handled out of class. It their flipped classrooms, students watch streaming videos at their leisure out of class. Class time is dedicated to providing students a forum where they can work through their problem sets and ask for – and get – help as they need it. This flipped classroom is going to become far more widespread because our technologies today enable it – and it just makes a lot of sense.

Adaptation on steroids Adaptation is nothing new. It’s been going on for thousands of years. The idea is that course material or explanations or problem sets or tutoring is tailored to the individual needs of the student. But when we put that adaptation on steroids, we see a shift in “kind.” In other words, we see something that was not present before. Today we can monitor every move students make, not just count the right and wrong answers they give to a quiz question. By analyzing facial expressions, delays in responding, and a myriad of other variables, we can tailor make and deliver a tutorial specifically suited to a student’s learning problem at the moment the problem occurs.

Institutional evaluation Schools have always presumed to grade their students. Until relatively recently, it was presumptuous for students to grade their teachers or their schools. Now it is becoming common practice. In fact, Big Data will play an ever-growing role in assessing the performance of individual instructors. More importantly, Big Data will rank order universities, colleges, and high schools on a wide range of variables that can be supported through empirical evidence. True, some of that evaluation will be based on “sentiment” – but much of it will be based on hard analytics that would have been too time consuming or too expensive to collect and analyze in a holistic manner.

The Jury Is Still Out

In spite of all the investment, the excitement, and the promise of Big Data in Education, we still don’t have enough experience to make categorical claims about its value. We are still struggling the top Big Data challenges we face.

In an article in The Washington Post last year, Sahlberg and Hasak claimed that the promised benefits of Big Data have not been delivered. As a visiting professor at The Harvard Graduate School of Education, Sahlberg is an authority we should listen to. He claims that our preoccupation with test results reveal nothing about the emotions and relationships that are pivotal in the learning process.   Our commitment to judging teachers by their students’ test scores has the effect of steering top performing teachers away from low performing schools – exactly where they are most needed. There are extensive efforts to evaluate both teachers and students. However, according to Sahlberg, this has NOT led to any improvement in teaching in the US.

The most that Big Data can offer is an indication of a high correlation between one factor and another. It cannot tell about cause and effect. In fact, cause and effect argments are difficult for people to make – and yet they are instrumental in building compelling arguments. Having said that, it is revealing to recognize that finding high correlations in other fields – even without a demonstrated cause and effect relationship – have proven to be quite beneficial.

Big Data is everywhere in the Retail Industry

Retail and big data

Big Data is everywhere in the Retail Industry. It would be be hard to find any part of the management of retail operations that is not deeply touched by Big Data. In fact, it is already clear that to survive in the Amazon era, all retailers will have to rely heavily on Big data to help them store the right merchandise, at the right times, in the right quantity, and at the right price. Those that ignore it will die.

This does not mean that only the large companies that have the resources to exploit Big Data will thrive while small companies will die. Small companies will be able to harness the power of Big Data – but they are likely to do so through niche consulting firms that have developed the professional and technical skills, hired a stable of experts, built the computing platforms, and acquired access to the massive data required to operate effectively in this field. Smaller retail outfits that buy their services will find them expensive – but the benefits should far outweigh those costs.

The biggest costs will likely not appear on the company’s financial ledger. The biggest costs will be the time, focus, and energy that senior and middle management will need to invest to come to grips with how to leverage Big Data and how to build investment arguments that make sense. This last point proved to be a major stumbling block when general data processing began to make inroads into large and then medium sized companies some 40 years ago. It is quite liable to prove to be a stumbling block in the application of Big Data as well.

Online and Store General Merchandisers

With regards to department stores, the most promising use of Big Data is through recommendation engines.

Recommendation engines — Recommendation engines use the historical purchasing decisions of customers to predict future purchases and recommend other products to customers that they may be interested in. Big Data using these engines have the potential to generate accurate product recommendations to customers before they even leave the webpage. Amazon, for example, sees a 30%-60% revenue uplift due to these recommendations alone. These recommendation engines are a widely-used way of incorporating Big Data into department stores because they are easy to implement and have an immediate positive impact on revenue: recommendation engines are shown to have the potential to boost revenue by 24% on average.

Trend Forecasting — The second biggest use of Big Data in department stores is predicting trends and forecasting demand. Trend forecasting algorithms comb social media and web browsing habits to find what products and services are causing buzz. These algorithms also analyze ads to see what products marketing departments are pushing. The algorithms then compare the data gathered from social media with the data gathered from current ads to accurately predict what the top selling products for a given quarter will be, how to better market products, and how to develop more cost-effective marketing strategies.

These predictive algorithms assist retailers in making better informed decisions about stocking and product ordering. This capability is particularly helpful during the holiday season when shopping rates increase – machine learning can use past historical shopping data to forecast future purchasing and revenue outcomes. It is anticipated that this kind of predictive analysis in department stores will grow from a $2.7 billion global market in 2015 to a $9.2 billion by 2020, a CAGR of around 27%. In the US alone, predictive analysis from big data is expected to reach a $3.6 billion market by 2020. As of 2015, less than 25% of department stores had adopted predictive analytics. Between 2018 and 2020 this is anticipated to grow to 70%.

After identifying trends, Big Data (particularly in regards to customer economic and geographic information) can be used to understand where and when this demand will come from. This helps business to generate effective marketing and advertising campaigns. For example, Ozon.ru (Russia’s first online retailer) analyzed that demand for books rises when it gets colder during the winter months, and thus increases the number of book ads their customers see. This ability to accurately forecast demand, that comes with using Big Data, is helpful in lowering a business’s costs, as it is expensive to keep excess inventory on shelves and having too little stock drives down revenue and decreases customer engagement and loyalty.

Price Optimization — The third main use for big data in department store retail is optimizing pricing. In retail, Big Data can be used to help assist in determining when prices should be dropped (marked down optimization) or when they can be raised without customer dissatisfaction (reflected by a lack or reluctance to purchase). Previously, before the advent of Big Data, markdowns occurred at the end of the buying season, with stores hugely discounting their remaining merchandise. The problem with this approach is that demand is already gone by the time that markdowns occur. Big Data analytics demonstrate that what is actually most effective in increasing revenues is to gradually lower prices once demand initially begins to decrease. When the US retailer Stage Stores employed this technique, it could increase its traditional end of season sales revenue over 90% of the time.

Weather Optimization — Big Data is particularly helpful in optimizing prices in accordance with weather conditions. The Weather Company (part of IBM) has found that “weather is one of the largest swing factors for economic and business performance” – 60% of shoppers change their behaviors when it is either raining or it is hotter than average out. A 1o F drop in temperatures below 60o produces a 2%-3% drop in apparel sales. Approximately 60%-70% of a retailer’s excess expenses are due to weather-impacted supply chain costs (e.g., trucks held up due to poor weather conditions). In the UK, if temperatures reach over 65o F there is a 22% rise in fizzy drink sales, a 20% rise in juice sales, and a 90% rise in lawn furniture sales. In the US, temperatures below 64o F increase sales in soup, porridge, and lip care. Food, drink, pharmaceutical, and apparel sales are the categories most impacted by weather.

Targeting Individual Consumers — The final use of Big Data in general retail is identifying individual customers and how to most effectively market to and target them specifically – whether through email, text, or location-based alerts. Retailers, for example, can install sensors in their stores to identify customers’ locations through their smartphones. If a customer’s smartphone’s WiFi is turned on, it will attempt to connect with the store’s internet and this is how a customer’s location can be sensed and tracked. Retailers can then track what specific stores she visited, what departments she visited, and what products she purchased at what time and on what date. This information can be used to better understand each customer’s movements and patterns when it comes to shopping. Retailers can then use this information to reorganize their stores to optimize customers’ shopping experience and even to offer special deals and coupons to bring further business to their stores.

General Online Retailers

In addition to the Big Data applications listed above, there are four other applications that apply specifically to online retailers.

Dynamic Pricing — Dynamic pricing is Big Data at its finest. Dynamic pricing is highly responsive to external factors such as consumer demand and competitors’ prices. Dynamic pricing collects trend data about which products are being bought to automatically adjust prices. Its analytic capabilities slowly increase prices on items that are popular and discounts prices on items that are less popular. Dynamic pricing is key to increasing online retailers’ overall revenue.

Individual Customer Experience — Big Data analysis gives sellers insights about customer behavior and demographics and provides customers a personalized experience. For instance, customer data can be used to create buyer-specific e-mails for promotional campaigns. For example,  Amazon’s “Customers who bought this item also bought…” recommendation feature increased sales nearly 30% when it was first implemented. This is a simple and remarkably effective way to keep customers on a retail site and keep them buying. Consumers might have reservations about their favorite retailers knowing intimate details about their lives, but they’re going to love the results in practice. Sharing all those personal tidbits is helping companies like CNA identify fraud and prevent customers from having their identities compromised. Retailers can use information from live transactions and other sources (such as social feeds and geo data from apps) to prevent credit card fraud in real time.

Better Quality of ProductsAmazon is the e-commerce standard when it comes to smart, effective pricing. It can easily access its competitors’ pricing data and respond quickly with its own deals — changing some items’ prices up to 10 times a day. The industry-wide shift to dynamic pricing means that companies will no longer be competing on price alone. They will now need to establish a reputation for offering their customers the best value and the best experience.

Reduce incidents of shopping cart abandonment — Companies can also use cross-device tracking to reduce shopping cart abandonment rates. EBay research found that the average consumer uses as many as three or five devices or platforms during the course of her buying journey. Mapping this journey with data allows retailers to help their customers’ transition from one device to the next and complete their purchases.

Cheat Sheet: Everything you Need to know about Big Data and the Mortgage Industry

mortgage industry

It’s common knowledge that Big Data has arrived in the Mortgage Industry. One of the most important questions leaders in our industry need to ask themselves, of course, is “Where is it all going?”  We’re going to give you our take on this issue in just a moment. But first, let me give a short synopsis of what Big Data is for those who are new to this field.

 

What is Big Data?

Historically, all the data computers used was set up in highly structured data bases. In other words, we had separate fields for each piece of data and we spent a lot of time and effort to make sure all the data was clean and accurate.  Big Data does away with that. Big Data reads data that was never meant to be analyzed by a computer.  This includes everything from Tweets and Facebook postings to newspaper clippings. All of these were written for human consumption, not for computer processing.

Big Data cut through that.  Big Data is able to read all of this unstructured, messy stuff that was never meant for computers and then makes sense of it.  It other words, it can read Tweets and Facebook postings and data from hundreds of different sources that are written in incompatible styles and assign meaning to what it’s reading.  In the mortgage industry, this means that we can now tap into huge reservoirs of information that were always available to us before – data that is in the public domain, but we could never get a computer to work with it.

Now let’s take a look at where Big Data is going to take the mortgage industry.

 

Big Data can be used to improve already existing mortgage processes.

  1. Pre-populate mortgage applications

We believe that Big Data is going to pre-populate mortgage applications. In other words, Big Data will mine data from bank records, publicly available data bases, social media sites, and other sites to collect all or nearly all the information required for a mortgage application. This will leave the applicant with the option of either clicking to ratify the pre-populated application as accurate or, on the other hand, edit a few fields here and there to fine tune the application.

Another approach here is for prospective home owners to complete their mortgage applications as they always have and then the mortgage company’s computers will compare the pre-populated versions with the applicants’ versions to identify discrepancies.

In either case, the objective of this exercise will be to enhance the accuracy of the data in the applications at the same time the system reduces the burden on the applicants.

  1. Computer algorithms to score mortgage applications

We can also see that computer algorithms will score mortgage applications using machine learning algorithms. These algorithms will approve or deny the applications immediately. Approved applications may be forwarded for processing right away. Rejected applications will qualify for a human review if the applicants don’t feel they have been scored properly. The goal of this instant evaluation will be to eliminate the delays in the current manual evaluation process – delays that are often measured in weeks.

We can see that Big Data will be instrumental in projecting the number of applications for new mortgages or refinanced mortgages in specific geographies and specific time frames. Further, Big Data will project the total value of these mortgages. These projections will help mortgage companies reposition their people and processing power based on projected market demand.  These projections would be based on the current mortgage portfolio the industry has in place in various geographic areas coupled with scenarios about shifts in mortgage interest rates.

  1. Big Data analysis of non-monetary defaults

We can expect to see Big Data analysis of non-monetary defaults on mortgages to become more common if not universal.  Here, I’m talking about flagging accounts where payments were made early and with an extra principal payment to being made on time with no extra payment. Or we will find homeowners whose home owner association is suing them. Or maybe the local government put a lien on the property on the grounds that the property is uninhabitable. Or the couple is getting divorced.  These are all early warning signs that Big Data will track as a matter of course. 

  1. More Objective Residential Property Appraisals

Residential property appraisals will become more objective and more accurate. Big Data will propose the most appropriate neighborhood comparable. It will develop appraisals using industry standards that will be driven by an algorithm. MReport claimed that, “More than 30 percent of loans fall short of the collateral valuation agreed to between customer and loan officer.” Big Data will help fix that.

Big Data is bringing big changes

 

How is the Business of Big Data Affecting the Mortgage Industry? 

  1. Increase in spending on Big Data

Spending on Big Data applications and technology will soar.  In 2014, 2015, and 2017, we’ve seen Big Data spending in the mortgage industry at $2.6 billion, $2.8 billion, and $3.2 billion respectively. We are going to see spending on Big Data continue to climb as the number of success stories grows.

  1. Increased need for big data analysts within the mortgage industry

The mortgage industry is going to suffer a severe shortage of Big Data analysts who know how to manipulate the huge and ever-growing quantities of data that will become available. We are going to need professionals who can manage the enquiries in ways that lead to highly defensible conclusions.  The growth in the demand for Big Data analysts is going to outstrip the supply.

  1. Increase in consultants

We are going to see the rapid growth of specialized firms that assist mortgage companies plan for and implement Big Data projects.  This function is going to outsourced rather than treated as a core competence for several reasons.  First, most mortgage companies will find it far too expensive to build their own in-house facilities.  Second, the process of building their in-house facilities will take too long and are liable to face many dead-end alleys. Third, they will not be able to attract the talent they need at a price they can afford.  Fourth, the management in existing mortgage companies will need to go through a steep learning curve that is best handled by a specialized firm.  Over time, we can expect mortgage companies to build teams of in-house Big Data talent while leaving the technologies to cloud-based firms.

As a result, Small mortgage companies that cannot afford to buy the necessary technologies will be squeezed out of business. Larger companies will buy them.

  1. Automation and Big Data will be an important pair

Mortgage companies are going to increasingly focus on building higher quality portfolios with fewer staff.  The only way to have a smaller staff complement and a larger mortgage portfolio is through automation.  That should be obvious.  Automation in general and Big Data in particular is the way of the future.

 

*Warning*: New Players

We are going to see many new, non-traditional players in the mortgage industry.  They will spring from places like Silicon Valley.  They will offer better service at lower costs than banks and traditional mortgage companies. For example, the Lending Club facilitated $3.6 billion in loans in the first six months of 2015.  Likewise, Prosper is growing fast.

 

How Does Big Data Help the Mortgage Industry Keep up with New Regulations and Laws?

We can expect the Federal Housing Administration to develop a growing number of regulations that the mortgage industry must comply with.  Many of these regulations will apply to a company’s portfolio of mortgages rather than any given mortgage.  Mortgage processors will continue to ensure that they comply with application specific compliance issues, but they cannot be expected to deal with portfolio-wide compliance issues.  In fact, it is unlikely that it is humanly possible to do so.  This means that mortgage companies will necessarily embrace Big Data to do that job for them.  Failure to do so means that they will face stiff penalties in court.  It is far better for these companies to catch non-compliance failures on their own and take action than to face their regulators in court.

Carl Pry, a managing director at Treliant Risk Advisors, said “It’s in every bank’s best interest to get one step ahead of the regulators and understand what that regulator is going to know and find. They need to resolve any discrepancies [and] do any file review analysis needed to be able to explain any disparities before the regulators find them.”

Here are a few more examples of how Big Data helps keep Mortgage companies out of legal trouble:

  • New regulations and compliance issues are making the appraisal process increasingly difficult. That, coupled with the fact that the number of qualified appraisers is not keeping up with the demand, means that the industry must necessarily rely on broad based, sophisticated tools like Big Data. This trend will continue.
  • Big Data is going to prove instrumental in flagging potential fraudulent mortgage transactions. The FBI and other law enforcement agencies are developing increasingly sophisticated techniques to identify potential abuses. Big Data algorithms will incorporate these fraud detection techniques into their algorithms and trigger pre-emptive enquiries.

 

Big Data, The Mortgage Industry, and the Mortgage Buyer: How Relations Can Be Vastly Improved

 Decades ago the local bank manager knew his customers well and was in a position to make an informed judgment call about the amount of credit to be extended.  Bank managers rarely make those decisions in retail bank branches and mortgage companies today.  Rather, those decisions are made by a committee – often in another city.  We need to reinvest some humanity into the decision-making process. Incorporating social media will go a long way in that direction.

The mortgage approval process is going to become more transparent. At the moment, borrowers only know whether they are approved or rejected, but they rarely have an idea why they were slotted where they were.  In the future, mortgage companies will be in a position to coach their applicants very specifically about what they need to do to be approved.

Additionally, Big Data is going to help reduce the risk in mortgage lending. Big Data will help brokers advise their clients about school performance and community crime rates. This will help the buyers make better-informed decisions and, ideally, lead to lower risk mortgages.

**Warning:**Potential future issues: Privacy

The privacy issue is going to become a big issue in Big Data.  Although everything Big Data practitioners do is legal, the act of mining social media on a wholesale basis was never considered when social media sites were first introduced.  We are going to see some interesting and instructive debates on ethical issues over the next decade before we see a consensus emerge.  Any legislation passed before those ethical debates come to closure will prove to be ill-conceived and counterproductive.

 

Conclusion

Just to wrap up, I want to make it clear that Big Data is already having an impact on how the mortgage industry operates and we are still at the early stages. We are going to be in for a very interesting ride over the next few years.

If you want to learn more about this, feel free to get in touch with me directly.  I’m Eskinder Assefa, CEO of SOMAmetrics in Berkeley, California. We work with mortgage companies to help them realize their full business potential by improving their sales and marketing strategies and leveraging emerging technologies that have an impact on the bottom line.

How to Develop New Business and Break Into New Industry Sectors (Quadrant 4)

develop new business

“How to Develop New Business and Break Into New Industry Sectors” is part of our “Four Quadrants for High Growth Quick Start Guide”.  To access the full series click here

Quadrant 4: Develop New Business Outside your Industry

soma-quadrant4

Overall Goal: Find a new customer type for each new product every two years, thereby increasing sales by product by another 10%-20% every two years.

As may have been apparent by now, the first three quadrants are very similar to each other. Quadrants 1 and 2 are particularly similar to each other since they consist of your existing customers. Quadrant 3 should also be similar since, at least in theory, it is from the same industry as your existing customers.

Quadrant 4, however, is different. It consists of non-customers from different industry sectors than those to whom you normally sell your products and services. It is actually an exercise in new business development.

The right approach to developing Quadrant 4 is to follow Geoffrey Moore’s advice in Crossing the Chasm and first establish a beachhead.  Assemble a team of your best people to go after a few selected accounts that will make key wins for you within the new industry, enabling you to establish credibility early on. Your team members should be highly entrepreneurial and have a very strong “whatever it takes’’ attitude to winning these new customer types in an industry that no one in your company is familiar with.

In Quadrant 4, what you are really trying to do is to sell a product you first developed for a different market segment, with some modification and customization. You have some idea of what that customization might look like, but in truth you don’t really know until you get you are working hard to get your first sale in that segment. This is more like a custom project, which is why you need the team to be highly entrepreneurial, capable of building something from the ground up and finding a solution for a problem that you have never really addressed before.

Below you will find a Best Practices checklist for optimizing high growth within Quadrant 4 for Marketing, Sales, Customer Service, and Innovation.

 

Marketing Checklist

GOAL

Identify other market segments similar enough to your current market segment so as to be able to leverage many of the capabilities you already have.

KEY OPTIMIZATION ACTION ITEMS
  • Setup a Market Strategy team that explores applications of your current products to solve problems outside your current market.
  • Build a disciplined market segment analysis approach to identify the best opportunities

Sales Checklist

GOAL

Find the early adopters and key accounts in the new market segment

KEY OPTIMIZATION ACTION ITEMS
  • Setup a New Business Development unit charged with finding the right entry points within the selected potential growth area.
  • Define the compensation plan for rewarding success.

Customer Support Checklist

GOAL

Do everything necessary to create highly satisfied and referenceable customers.

KEY OPTIMIZATION ACTION ITEMS

Set up a “Special Accounts” team whose priority is to do whatever it takes to make these early adopters highly successful with your products.

Innovation Checklist

GOAL

Make it easy to custom fit your products to new market needs within 90 days.

KEY OPTIMIZATION ACTION ITEMS
  • Create a platform for your products that enable you to customize and support various versions of your products.
  • Rapidly complete Proof of Concept (POC) projects.
  • Rapidly convert approved POC into stable products.

Increase Your Customer Base with 4 Handy Checklists (Quadrant 3)

“Increase Your Customer Base with 4 Handy Checklists” is part of our “Four Quadrants for High Growth Quick Start Guide”.  To access the full series click here

Quadrant 3: Increase Customer Base

soma-quadrant3Overall Goal: Increase the number of your customers by 15%-20% per year

Quadrant 3 Sales is what most companies think of when they talk about revenue growth—increasing your customer base numbers. In fact many of the companies we work with focus so much time, effort, and money on Quadrant 3 that they neglect working Quadrants 1 and  2.

At the same time, most of these companies do not use the most critical strategy for farming in Quadrant 3: Four Funnel Framework. This is the most important strategy for winning new customers because it ensures tight integration of Sales and Marketing efforts. We will discuss the Four Funnels Framework in more detail in the next section.

Below you will find a Best Practices checklist for optimizing high growth within Quadrant 3 for Marketing, Sales, Customer Service, and Innovation.

Marketing Checklist

GOAL

Deliver the necessary number of Marketing Qualified Leads.

KEY OPTIMIZATION ACTION ITEMS
  • Define the marketing content (assets) necessary to drive prospects through the various levels of interest: awareness, understanding, acceptance, preference, and conviction. The marketing assets must deliver the first three stages to generate Marketing Qualified Leads (MQLs)
  • Build the automation that scores the activities of very early prospects and provides them with more marketing assets until they score high enough to be MQLs ready for handoff to the Tele-prospecting team

Sales Checklist

GOAL

Increase the number of customers by 15-20% per year.

KEY OPTIMIZATION ACTION ITEMS
  • Define the qualification criteria that makes a Sales Qualified Lead (SQL).
  • Develop the qualification and SQL acceptance process and build it into the Sales Operations and Sales Automation system.
  • Automate the handoff and notification process so that Sales immediately follows up on SQLs.
  • Build the right compensation plan that rewards progress through the Sales Cycle so that deals do not get stalled in the middle.
  • Build the right comp plan that rewards hunters for getting even small deals in key accounts that have significant upside potential.

Customer Support Checklist

GOAL

Convert new customers to happy and fully satisfied ones within the first 2-3 weeks.

KEY OPTIMIZATION ACTION ITEMS
  • Design the new customer onboarding process to be as quick and as painless as possible.
  • Develop a scorecard that identifies the components of onboarding a new customer and rates the new customer onboarding team along each component.
  • Map the components of the scorecard into the customer support system and processes so that agents can do their work with a high level of efficiency and accuracy.

Innovation Checklist

GOAL

Make your products easy to learn, use, and support so as to free up scarce resources for new product.

KEY OPTIMIZATION ACTION ITEMS

Review your current products and determine what can be done to centralize, standardize, componentize, and optimize to make them easy to sell, support, and use.

How to Sell New Products to Existing Customers (Quadrant 2)

existing customers

“How to Sell New Products to Existing Customers” is part of our “Four Quadrants for High Growth Quick Start Guide”.  To access the full series click here

Quadrant 2: Introduce new products

soma-quadrant2Overall Goal

Increase the number of products that each customer uses by 15-20% each year.

Quadrant 2 is all about selling other products and services you offer that your customers have not yet purchased. The most important of these are Upgrades, Add-ons; and Bundles or Packages. Quadrant 2 offers some highly attractive growth opportunities for a company that is set up to take advantage of it.

Below you will find a Best Practices checklist for optimizing high growth within Quadrant 2 for Marketing, Sales, Customer Service, and Innovation.

Marketing Checklist

GOAL

Continually market to existing customers about how the value of their existing products increase significantly when used with another product that you sell, but that they don’t currently use.

KEY OPTIMIZATION ACTION ITEMS
  • Have an accurate database of which customer has which products installed.
  • Build an automated marketing that works on the logic, “If a customer has product A, then use Campaign X. If a customer has products A and B, then use campaign Y”, and so on.

Sales Checklist

GOAL

Build an effective account management team that is very good at selling new products to existing customers with the goal of increasing revenue per customer.

KEY OPTIMIZATION ACTION ITEMS
  • Set up an account management system that uses the marketing database to call on customers to cross-sell and upgrade them to higher tier products.
  • Build your compensation plan to reward such account penetration.

Customer Support Checklist

GOAL

Make customers highly successful at using your new products within 30 days of acquiring these.

KEY OPTIMIZATION ACTION ITEMS
  • Build a library of training material and resources to enable customers to self-train to use new products.
  • Build scalable support infrastructure such as chat and self-help portals to provide quality customer support with less impact on the Support organization.

Innovation Checklist

GOAL

Introduce new products and services on a regular schedule—at least every 2-3 years.

KEY OPTIMIZATION ACTION ITEMS
  • Set up a Product strategy team that continually reviews the product pipeline and prioritizes new projects.
  • Set up agile development practices to enable rapid and iterative releases of products so as to enable quick changes based on shifts in customer priorities and preferences.
  • Set up Product Management to translate big initiatives that come from Product Strategy into clearly defined tasks that are implemented through the agile development process.

How to Sell More to Existing Customers (Quadrant 1)

This article is part of our “Four Quadrants for High Growth Quick Start Guide”.  Click here to access the full series.

Quadrant 1 Goal: Increase Usage from Existing Customers

Overall Goal: Increase usage of existing customers by an average of 5-10% over the previous year.

soma-quadrant1

Quadrant 1 consists of existing customers who already buy a particular product. The goal here is to get these customers to order more of what they are already buying. If you sell software licenses, can you get them to subscribe to more licenses? If they buy boxes of widgets, can you get them to order more boxes?

Whatever product a company sells, the goal is to increase their consumption of that product by a targeted amount. If you are selling software licenses, can you increase the average license purchase per customer by ‘x’ amount? If your customer orders 100 boxes of widgets a year from you, can you increase that to 110 boxes? And how do you do that?

This is a low-touch sales environment. You want to simplify and standardize your operations so you can automate as much as you can. You want it to resemble a self-help portal where you let customers order what they want, when they want. The key is to continually market to them to drive them to do just that.

Below you will find some important tips on optimizing sales and marketing in this quadrant.

Marketing Optimization

GOAL

The goal here is to automate all marketing to continually touch existing customers and give them new reasons to buy more of the products they are already using.

KEY OPTIMIZATION ACTION ITEMS
  • Continually come up with new ways to use your existing products that your customers are not currently doing.
  • Constantly update customers about new features that make things easier, faster for the customer
  • Give additional promotional incentive to increase usage–price savings on additional purchases, discounts on other products, etc.
  • Make certain premium services free for purchasing higher volumes
  • Send at least one promotional email campaign each month to make sure you stay front-of-mind

Sales Optimization

GOAL

Increase Sales of existing products to existing customers

Ideally, Quadrant 1 sales can be completed without the help or involvement of a sales rep.

KEY OPTIMIZATION ACTION ITEMS
  • Make it very simple for customers to order more.
  • Automate price quotes, contracts, and ordering.
  • Make it simple to fulfill the order immediately.
  • Automate workflows to send orders to fulfillment as soon as contracts are signed.